LICENSING/REGISTRATION: Captive Insurer/Domestic RRG

Year-end Requirements

Captive Insurers are an important alternative to traditional insurance because they enable businesses to control and customize their insurance costs and coverages in a manner that is more responsive to their financial objectives.

Noteworthy attributes of forming a captive include:

  • Address availability and affordability issues
  • Customize insurance program
  • Reduce total cost of risk
  • Stabilize premium
  • Retain underwriting and investment income
  • Increase control over claims process
  • Access reinsurance market
  • Improve consolidated tax position

Since the inception of its Captive program in 2002, Arizona has become a leading captive insurance domicile in the US. The Arizona Department of Insurance offers a stable, responsive, cohesive team of insurance professionals who have the necessary expertise and experience to foster a competitive, sound, and market-responsive captives program. We know there are many choices when selecting a captive domicile and we are proud that so many captives have selected Arizona as their preferred state of domicile!

If you are interested in discussing the formation of a Captive insurer in Arizona, please call us!

ARS § 41-1030(G) requires most Arizona government agencies to prominently print the provisions of ARS § 41-1030(B), (D), (E) and (F) on all license applications.  The following is the language in ARS § 41-1030(B), (D), (E) and (F):

B.        An agency shall not base a licensing decision in whole or in part on a licensing requirement or condition that is not specifically authorized by statute, rule or state tribal gaming compact. A general grant of authority in statute does not constitute a basis for imposing a licensing requirement or condition unless a rule is made pursuant to that general grant of authority that specifically authorizes the requirement or condition.

D.        This section may be enforced in a private civil action and relief may be awarded against the state.  The court may award reasonable attorney fees, damages and all fees associated with the license application to a party that prevails in an action against the state for a violation of this section.

E.        A state employee may not intentionally or knowingly violate this section.  A violation of this section is cause for disciplinary action or dismissal pursuant to the agency’s adopted personnel policy.

F.         This section does not abrogate the immunity provided by section 12-820.01 or 12-820.02.